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Central America

Our earliest projects originated in Central America, beginning with wells in Nicaragua. Hope Springs Water partnered with the Trinity Valley Community College Student Senate from Athens, Texas, to dig wells in villages along the Coco River. Since that first trip, we have launched a major initiative in Belize that will ultimately result in the reclamation of more than 24 wells over the next two years.

Learn more about projects in Central America and other areas of the world by clicking one of the projects below.

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Sub-Saharan Africa

Africa has one of the highest percentages of deaths related to water-borne diseases than any country we go to. The World Health Organizations reports that 1.4 MILLION children die each year from preventable diarrhoeal diseases.

Hope Springs Water has answered the cries for clean water in this beautiful continent by placing wells in Bunyagira, Uganda, and the Tollee region of Ethiopia. We have also partnered with other organizations to fund wells in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a rainwater catchment, and storage system in Rwanda and a water treatment project in Sierra Leone to help ward off an impending cholera epidemic.

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Special Projects

In 2013, Hope Springs Water provided emergency support for a point of access water treatment project in Sierra Leone. This special project helped to ward off an impending cholera epidemic and saved as many as 12,000 people from the devastating effects of the deadly disease. That same year, we received a desperate request for help at an orphanage in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The orphans’ only source of water flowed through a rusty, corroded pipe located in the facility’s courtyard. As many as 7 children a month were dying from dysentery and other water-borne diseases. Hope Springs Water was able to help provide funding and project oversight to bring clean water to these forgotten children.

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Hope For Girls

Few experiences in a young girl’s life bring with them more change, curiosity, and significance than that of menarche, commonly known as a girl’s first period. But, in many places around the world, this phase in the life of a young girl is marked by confusion, isolation, fear, and shame. The average woman menstruates for 3,000 days of her life, yet due to social norms and taboos surrounding this topic, menstruation hygiene management (MHM) is often overlooked in WaSH programs. 

In 2016, Hope Springs Water began focusing specifically on women empowerment through our Hope for Girls initiative. This three-pronged approach seeks to eliminate the three most common barriers to a girl’s secondary education: inadequate access to water, sanitation, and menstruation-hygiene-management. 

Click here to find out more and get involved!